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Live Q&A: Inspiring Future Women in Science

Watch the live webcast beginning at 4 pm ET on Thursday, February 11, 2021.

While the COVID-19 pandemic has shone a spotlight on many scientific careers – from the virologists and epidemiologists studying the virus and its spread, to the lab technicians processing nasopharyngeal swabs, to name just a few – many high school students still don’t understand the vast array of career options a degree in science opens up.

For years, Perimeter’s annual Inspiring Future Women in Science conference has aimed to connect some of those dots, sharing the rewards, challenges, and possibilities of a science career and challenging stereotypes of who can succeed in these fields. This year is no exception, though the proceedings will take place entirely online. (View talks from past years via Perimeter’s YouTube channel.)

On Thursday, February 11, in celebration of the International Day of Women and Girls in Science, Perimeter is hosting a one-hour live Q&A with four dynamic women working in varied scientific fields: a first-generation university student completing a master’s in oceanography, an award-winning aerospace engineer, a cell biologist with a passion for increasing diversity in the STEMM fields, and an accomplished particle physicist from Perimeter’s own faculty.

Students must register to attend by 9:00 am ET on February 11 in order to pose questions to the speakers or upvote those of their peers. Anyone who simply wants to watch can do so via the YouTube stream embedded above.

Click here to register for the event, view more detailed speaker bios, and see what else Perimeter is doing to celebrate women in science.

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