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Take a self-guided tour from quantum to cosmos!

Watch online: 2020 Inspiring Future Women in Science conference

Watch the live webcast beginning at 9 am ET on Monday, March 9, 2020.

A theoretical astrophysicist, who also happens to be an amazing science communicator with an upcoming book about the end of the universe. A CEO whose STEM background helps her run an automobile parts manufacturer with more than 29,000 employees spanning 17 countries. A cancer biologist studying difficult-to-treat cancers that are most prevalent in young Black women.

These are just a few of the impressive speakers set to address a crowd of nearly 200 high school students at Perimeter’s annual Inspiring Future Women in Science conference.

For the third year in a row, Perimeter will also webcast the speakers and a panel discussion of other accomplished women in STEM live from the Institute’s Mike Lazaridis Theatre of Ideas. (View talks from past years via Perimeter’s YouTube channel.)

Interested in learning more about the rewards, challenges, and possibilities of a career in science? Tune in to the above link beginning at 9 am ET on Monday, March 9. The webcast will run for approximately two hours, with short breaks between each talk.

Click here for the full list of speakers and panelists.

You can also check out a trailer for the annual event below:

Logo of Linamar with the words "Power to Perform"

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