Now reading: Jocelyn Bell Burnell at Perimeter: a special public lecture webcast
Menu
Close
Close

Take a self-guided tour from quantum to cosmos!

Jocelyn Bell Burnell at Perimeter: a special public lecture webcast

Jocelyn Bell Burnell, winner of the 2018 Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics, is an accomplished scientist and champion for women in physics. As a graduate student in 1967, she co-discovered pulsars, a breakthrough widely considered one of the most important scientific advances of the 20th century. When the discovery of pulsars was recognized with the 1974 Nobel Prize in Physics, the award went to her graduate advisor. Undaunted, she persevered and became one of the most prominent researchers in her field and an advocate for women and other under-represented groups in physics.

She plans to use the $3 million Breakthrough Prize to fund women and other under-represented groups pursuing physics to bring greater diversity to the field.

During her distinguished career she has been president of both the Institute of Physics and the Royal Astronomical Society and is currently a Visiting Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Oxford and Chancellor of Scotland’s University of Dundee.

In a special Perimeter public lecture on Thursday, October 25, 2018, Dame Bell Burnell took our theatre and online audiences on a journey into the realm of pulsars, and shared stories from her personal journey of scientific discovery. The title of her talk evokes the moment she noticed something peculiar in experimental data, and how that peculiar find launched her career: “What is that?!” The Discovery of Pulsars: A Grad Student’s Story. 

You can download a free poster of Jocelyn Bell Burnell and other pioneering women of physics here, or by clicking the image below.

 

bmo logo

 

 

 

Further Exploration
Related

Simons Emmy Noether Fellow Malena Tejeda-Yeomans is studying heavy ion collisions that recreate the first moments after the big bang.

/Nov 22, 2022

Dark Matter Night will feature live talks on October 26 at both Perimeter Institute and the McDonald Institute, webcast free online.

/Oct 07, 2022

The CHIME/FRB Collaboration reveals a new type of fast radio burst with pulses spaced milliseconds apart in a new paper released today in Nature.

/Jul 13, 2022