Now reading: Celebrate the EHT’s black hole breakthrough with these free posters
Menu
Close
Close

Take a self-guided tour from quantum to cosmos!

Celebrate the EHT’s black hole breakthrough with these free posters

Download free high-res posters showcasing the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration and the groundbreaking image it attained of the M87 black hole.

EHT black holes

Humanity got its first look at a real black hole this week when the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration revealed its image of the black hole at the centre of the M87 galaxy.

“We have gone right to the edge of the event horizon, and seen the point of no return,” said EHT researcher Avery Broderick, who holds the Delaney Family John Archibald Wheeler Chair at Perimeter Institute. “This is an extraordinary moment in science.”

Broderick was among four scientists from the globe-spanning collaboration to unveil the historic image at a press conference April 10 in Washington, D.C.

The EHT — an interconnected network of eight telescopes around the world — is the highest-resolution instrument in the history of astronomy, which was needed to capture the image of the black hole 55 million light years away.

Humanity got its first look at a real black hole this week when the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration revealed its image of the black hole at the centre of the M87 galaxy. Commemorate this scientific landmark by downloading two new posters — one showcasing the historic image of the M87 black hole, and the other celebrating the global research project that made the image possible.

Download the posters

EHT posters

 

Related

Is the universe a hologram? Celestial holography researchers, like Perimeter’s Ana-Maria Raclariu, are exploring the idea as a new way of approaching quantum gravity.

/Jun 21, 2022

The Event Horizon Telescope collaboration, a globe-spanning consortium of researchers from Perimeter Institute and a dozen partner organizations, has released the first image of the supermassive black hole at the centre of our own galaxy.

/May 12, 2022

In the late 19th and early 20th century, a team of scholars at the Harvard College Observatory analyzed nearly half a million  photographs of the stars.  These astronomers discovered the types of stars, created the first modern catalog of stars, and ultimately even discovered what stars are made of. They were all women.

/Feb 08, 2022